The Edgar Cayce Legacy: Quotes and Mindset

Part 3 of 4

Someone who looked to Edgar Cayce as a model would be looking to find his or her own truth within themselves. The 1930s and 1940s when Cayce lived and was at the height of his influence while he was alive presaged the period of spiritual seeking that was the 1960s. This may mean that the 2040s will sort of parallel that decade as a time of seeking.

Cayce on sleep: 

“Sleep is that period when the soul takes stock of what it has acted upon, from one rest period to another; drawing comparisons, as it were, that make for harmony, peace, joy, love, long-suffering, patience, brotherly love, and kindness — fruits of the spirit; or hate, harsh words, unkind thoughts and oppressions which are the fruits of Satan. The soul dreaming either abhors what it has passed through, or it enters into the joy of its Lord.” 

 

On dreams: 

“Dreams are today’s answers to tomorrow’s questions.” 

 

On meditation: 

“Through prayer, we speak to God. In meditation, God speaks to us.” 

 

“Meditation is listening to the divine within. 

 

“What Is Meditation? It is not musing, not daydreaming; but as you find your bodies made up of the physical, mental and spiritual, it is the attuning of the mental body and the physical body to its spiritual source.” 

  

“We would not – from here – counsel anyone to be guided by influences from without. … If these come as in inspirational writings from within, and not as guidance from others – that is different … the inspirational may develop the soul of the individual, while the automatic may rarely reach beyond the force that is guiding or directing.” ~ Edgar Cayce 

 

On the importance of the heeding one’s intuition: 

“The more and more each is impelled by that which is intuitive, or the relying upon the soul force within, the greater, the farther, the deeper, the broader, the more constructive may be the result.” 

 

On the make-up of the universe: 

“In the consciousness of eternity, time is not, neither is space. In man’s consciousness, there appears so much mercy, so much love, that these have been called time and space.” 

 

On the most common thing a departed spirit wants to communicate to its family on Earth: 

“I am fine and happy. Your grief, however, is holding me back and making me sad. You can help me greatly by trying to overcome your sorrow. You must stop grieving!” 

 

On how to journal your dreams: 

  • Keep a notebook beside the bed. Record your dreams as soon as possible upon waking.
  • Suggest to yourself each night as you’re falling asleep, “I will remember my dreams.”
  • If you wake during the night, write down the main symbols. The entire dream will usually come back in the morning.
  • Practicekeenobservation in your dreams through self-suggestion prior to sleep. 
  • Look for these components in your dreams: the setting, the people, the action, the color, the feeling, and the words.
  • Work on analyzing your dreams every day, otherwise, their progression will be difficult to assess. 
  • If your dreams are illogical, three reasons are possible: only the fragments of the dream have been recalled; the dream is reflecting something illogical in the dreamer’s life; mental blocks have erased your recall.
  • If you’re unable to decipher an important dream, suggest to yourself, before your next sleep, that the dream repeats itself more clearly.
  • Nightmares, which bring with them an inability to move or cry out, usually indicate the wrong diet. To end the nightmarish dreams, change your diet. 
  • Dreams that are unchanged through the years indicate the dreamer’s resistance to change.
  • Dreams of ill health can be either literal or symbolic warnings.
  • When a problem confronts you, ask by prayer for guidance to be sent to you through your dreams.
  • If youre unable to decipher an important dream, suggest to yourself, before your next sleep, that the dream repeats itself more clearly.
  • Be practical in your interpretations. Always look first for a lesson. What have you refused to face or been ignoring?
  • Observe carefully recurrent dreams, as well as the serially progressive ones. These often illustrate progress or failure.
  • Dreams are the reaction of the inner self to daytime activity and often show the way out of the dilemma. Relate them to current activity, because dreams may be retrospective as well as prospective. 
  • Dreams come to guide and help, not to amuse. They direct your attention to errors of omission and commission and offer encouragement for the right endeavors. They also give us the opportunity to pray for others and to help them bear their burdens.
  • If you receive an unusual message, reduce it to common terms. See if the symbolism of the Bible can be of help in interpreting the dream.
  • Look for past-life experiences in your dreams. These manifest themselves not only in color but in the proper costume and setting of their period. They come to warn you against repeating the same old mistakes; to explain your relationship and reactions to certain people and places; to reduce your confusions; to enable you to better understand life. 
  • Don’t fear conversation with the so-called “dead” in dreams. If the communication is one-sided, it denotes telepathy. If both participate, it may be an actual encounter of bodiless consciousness.
  • Dreams are primarily about self. Only a few dreams relate to family, friends, and world events.
  • Watch for mental telepathy in dreams.
  • Remember, persistence is necessary to learn any new language. Dream symbols are the forgotten language of the subconscious.
  • Give daily thanks to God for all things. Use daily prayer to improve the quality and reception of your dreams.

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