Are You Sleep Deprived Or Just Sleepy?

Saying “sleep-deprived” can give you a dangerous attitude

So are you sleepy or sleep-deprived?

When you’re talking about yourself, it shouldn’t matter.  

Thdistinction between the two are, at most, separated by a thread. The distinctions are best left to experts for debate. Many experts like to split hairs with little insight to be gained by such hair-splitting. 

If you’re sleep-deprived, you’re going to be sleepy. It comes with the territory.

Usually, however, sleep-deprived refers to a lack of sleep over a longer period of time than sleepy does. However, with the imprecise way people throw around their language, it might not necessarily be the intended meaning. 

When it comes to yourself, not getting enough sleep is a horrible state to be in.  

When you don’t get enough sleep, your ability to make decisionsuffer. You’re more inclined to get into traffic accidents, either as a motorist or pedestrian. Your bodily defenses against illness become weaker.  

It can be costly on a relationship and career basis too. The inability to control your feelings becomes more apparent as the lack of sleep persists. You might cry. You might fly into a rage.  

You might ruin your life, at least for a while until you see and fully accept the truth of what I’m telling you. 

Whatever happens, going without sleep probably won’t strengthen your relationships, let you ace any of the tests life throws at you, or help you better your lot.

Getting enough sleep is pretty far down the list of the basic things people need to have in order to thrive. 

If you’re in an occupation that requires quick reflexes and sound judgment, trying to work while truly being sleepy or sleep-deprived can get you killed. More than one oilfield worker and soldier have suffered serious injury and death due to a lack of sleep. 

Sometimes a schedule can be a challenge to keep, but, nevertheless, nothing good can really come of going without sleep. At most, when you’re irrevocably exhausted, you’re little more than a placeholder, occupying a space. 

Say You’re “Sleep Deprived” For a Dramatic Flare 

If you want to go around dramatically referring to yourself as sleep-deprived, fine. People often enjoy others who have a flair for the dramatic. They find them interesting. 

There’s nothing cool about it, however. It shouldn’t be a badge of distinction like you’re somehow too important to get seven to eight hours of sleep. Seeing it as glamorous means your health is eventually going to pay a price. Trying to do things when you’re overly tired means you’re not going to be doing anything with very much efficiency. It’s only cool to masochists.

Plenty of very important people get the recommended amount of sleep. At least we better hope they do. A lot of lives and careers ride on their decisions. We want them making the best decisions they can. 

Precious few people have a good excuse for under allocating time to sleep. Legitimate excuses are extremely rare outside of military survival training courses, the bedrooms of new parents, and enemy prisoner-of-war camps. 

In those cases, circumstances are forcing you to stay up and abandon your body’s need for sleep.  

You shouldn’t think there’s anything admirable about driving around town like a zombie as if that should ever be in fashion. You’re not able to think straight. It’s the root cause of many horrible, life-changing accidents. You’re operating with shoddy reflexes.

If you’re a new parent, you need to be doing everything you can to help your child sleep through the night. Sometimes that can be hard but you want to make sure that you’re not the one doing anything to delay their advancement. 

When You Should Give Up On Getting Enough Sleep?

When you need to. In the “unforgiving minute.” 

In the final lines of Rudyard Kipling’s famous poem IfKipling writes: 

If you can fill the unforgiving minute  

With sixty seconds’ worth of the distance run –  

Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,  

And – which is more – you’ll be a Man my son!  

This stanza has confused many people. 

When Kipling refers to the “unforgiving minute” he’s poetically describing a period of time with high stakes, the “now or never.” It’s time that matters. 

By definition, it’s not all the time. 

Then he talks about “sixty seconds worth of the distance run.” 

He’s talking about holding in, staying with doing what you’re doing to complete the job when it matters, as it does, when it’s the “unforgiving minute.” 

You’re not quitting. You’re sticking to it, holding in there, not giving up. 

That’s the only time when it’s okay to do important things when you’re overtired. 

Luckily, that’s a pretty rare instance. Most minutes are pretty forgiving. 

They’re made better if you keep your eye on the fundamentals of sleep.

Sleepiness Isn’t a Badge of Distinction

How can sleeplessness ever be cool?  

How can that make you special? 

Contrary to what you might think, it doesn’t prove you care more or are a better person. 

It should actually be sad when you’re sleepy and circumstance doesn’t permit you to lay down and rest.  

Sometimes people think less of you because you’re too sleepy. They think you can’t manage everything you have to do. They think you don’t have it together, that maybe you’re not very well organized.  

Guaranteed. They’re thinking something of you, and it isn’t necessarily good.  

Make sleep more of a priority than you have been. Seriously. 

Get enough sleep and be a wonder of efficiency.  

Make others think about how you have it all together.  

Really! How does he/she do it? With all they have to do, he/she gets seven hours of sleep every day! 

It might be me who you drive head-on into on a two-lane piece of blacktop.  

It might be me who you decide to go off on because you “can’t take it anymore!” 

I’m all for the world being a better place. 

If everybody got all of the sleep they neededthe world would be a better place for all of us. 

Yet, face the fact that everyone is going to have some trouble getting enough sleep from time to time.

Did You Allot Enough Time for Sleep?

If you’re asking the question, I have a feeling that you didn’t allow enough time for sleep.  

If you’ve been doing that for a while, that could be sleep deprivation.  

If it’s been a night or two, that could be being sleepy. 

If it was one extreme night, it could be sleepiness. 

Go to bed. It shouldn’t really matter which one it is. 

If you did allot enough time and then laid there half awake and this is the next day (or whatever you call the period of wakefulness that follows your night of what was supposed to be sleep), you might be sleepy. Laying there is the same thing as resting, even if you don’t drift off to sleep. It counts, even if it’s not high-quality sleep. It’s better than nothing.

You may have been perceiving yourself as being awake when you were actually asleep. Laying there is the first step to getting enough sleep.